The Latest

mysharona1987:

Best book title ever.
Apr 16, 2014 / 31 notes

mysharona1987:

Best book title ever.


Sebastian Errazuriz, Lampara de Lagrimas, (2013).
Apr 15, 2014 / 1,294 notes

Sebastian Errazuriz, Lampara de Lagrimas, (2013).

(via brwnpaperbag)

luzfosca:

Rocco Morabito
The Kiss of Life - Employee performs mouth to mouth resuscitation on his unconscious colleague after receiving an electric shock. Jacksonville, USA, 1967.
The company employee survived the accident and the photo won the Pulitzer Prize in 1968.
Apr 9, 2014 / 1,103 notes
Apr 7, 2014 / 1,446 notes

nevver:

Emoji nation, Nastya Ptichek

weandthecolor:

More images of the Earthquake Blend – San Francisco 1906 + 2010 by Shawn Clover on WE AND THE COLOR
Follow WATC on:FacebookTwitterGoogle+PinterestFlipboardInstagram
Apr 7, 2014 / 99 notes
Apr 5, 2014 / 1,868 notes

svdp:

French artist David Redon remixes vintage American ads and propaganda posters with modern day pop icons. In this series titled “Ads Libitum” Redon cleverly links selected songs from the artists to classic vintage prints that may have shared a similar idea. Check out the full series HERE

(via panodrama)

Apr 5, 2014 / 39,190 notes

iloveeverythingreally:

lifewithjaena:

uaetcoc:

All Night Prom at Disneyland, 1961 - Photographed by Ralph Crane.

One of my favourite photosets. 


UGH I WANT THIS SO BAD.

(via parsed-prose)

weandthecolor:

More of the paintings by Chinese artist Tangshi on WE AND THE COLOR
Follow WATC on:FacebookTwitterGoogle+PinterestFlipboardInstagram
Apr 5, 2014 / 306 notes
Apr 4, 2014 / 3,464 notes

likeafieldmouse:

Matthew Stone - Selections from Optimism as Cultural Rebellion and Unconditional Love

theatlantic:

This Man Took 445 Photobooth Portraits of Himself Over 30 Years, and Nobody Knows Why

For three decades, starting in the 1930s, he did the same thing. He’d sit inside a photo booth. He’d smile. He’d pose. 
And then—pop! pop! pop!—out would pop a glossy self-portrait, in shades of black and white. There he was, staring back at himself … and grinning. And, sometimes, almost scowling. There he was, mirthful. And, sometimes, almost scornful.  
The man—nobody knows who he was—repeated this process 455 times, at least, and he did so well into the 1960s. Nobody knows for sure why he did it. Or where he did it. All we know is that he took nearly 500 self-portraits over the course of thirty years, at a time when taking self-portraits was significantly more difficult than it is today, creating a striking record of the passage of time. 
The man’s effort is now being shared with the public in the form of a collection being shown at Rutgers’ Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick. “445 Portraits of a Man,” the exhibit is appropriately called, takes these early, earnest selfies and presents them as art. 
Read more. [Image courtesy Donald Lokuta]
Apr 3, 2014 / 2,725 notes

theatlantic:

This Man Took 445 Photobooth Portraits of Himself Over 30 Years, and Nobody Knows Why

For three decades, starting in the 1930s, he did the same thing. He’d sit inside a photo booth. He’d smile. He’d pose. 

And then—pop! pop! pop!—out would pop a glossy self-portrait, in shades of black and white. There he was, staring back at himself … and grinning. And, sometimes, almost scowling. There he was, mirthful. And, sometimes, almost scornful.  

The man—nobody knows who he was—repeated this process 455 times, at least, and he did so well into the 1960s. Nobody knows for sure why he did it. Or where he did it. All we know is that he took nearly 500 self-portraits over the course of thirty years, at a time when taking self-portraits was significantly more difficult than it is today, creating a striking record of the passage of time. 

The man’s effort is now being shared with the public in the form of a collection being shown at Rutgers’ Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick. “445 Portraits of a Man,” the exhibit is appropriately called, takes these early, earnest selfies and presents them as art.

Read more. [Image courtesy Donald Lokuta]

(via likeafieldmouse)

Apr 2, 2014 / 10,939 notes

nevver:

Pattern recognition, Klaus Leidorf

(via spikewilly1)

Apr 2, 2014 / 3,856 notes

instagram:

The Art of Stuffing Hair with @ahmad_abi

For more photos and videos of Ahmad’s hair, browse the #stuffedhair hashtag and follow @ahmad_abi on Instagram.

Egypt Instagrammer Ahmad El-Abi’s first #stuffedhair photo was originally a submission for the Weekend Hashtag Project on 2014 resolutions (#WHPresolutions2014). Ahmad stuffed his hair full of yellow rubber ducks he had bought in 2013 but never got round to doing anything with. Instead of creating a project about yellow rubber ducks, Ahmad had given birth to a creative and amusing new photo series on Instagram.

"Family and friends’ reaction to the photo was amazing," Ahmad muses. "I said to myself, I shall put stuff in my hair until I cut it and I made the ‘paper boats head' and the reaction was even more awesome and encouraging.”

Ahmad says many people comment asking how he creates the photos. “The most interesting (and difficult) photo was the ‘bubble head,’ because people couldn’t understand how the bubbles didn’t pop when they touched my hair. So I posted showing a making of the photo, which was really difficult to do. There were so many trial shots until I finally got one I liked.”

The reaction to the series from the Instagram community has inspired Ahmad to continue posting and explore a newfound interest in photography. “I hope to inspire others to open their eyes, to do what they love and to discover more about what they can do, because when I started photography three years ago, I didn’t know I would be doing conceptual/creative photography. I really love it when someone says my photos cheer them up because they are colorful and funny.”

(via npr)

dynamoe:

Waiter! Waiter! There’s a naked French broad in my soup!
hoodoothatvoodoo:

Illustration by Vald’ Es
Apr 2, 2014 / 281 notes

dynamoe:

Waiter! Waiter! There’s a naked French broad in my soup!

hoodoothatvoodoo:

Illustration by Vald’ Es

Apr 1, 2014 / 8,125 notes

nevver:

Matchsticks, Andy Yoder

Apr 1, 2014 / 5,966 notes